Notable Sir John Templeton Videos

Books by Sir John Templeton

Sir John Templeton Worldwide Law of Life

Worldwide Laws of Life is full of wisdom drawn from the major sacred Scriptures of the world and various schools of philosophical thought, as well as from scientists, artists, historians, and others. Its aim is to assist people of all ages to learn more about the universal truths of life that transcend modern times or particular cultures. This treasury of practical morality, personal inspiration, and daily guidance is perfect for people of all persuasions. The organization facilitates group or personal study and spiritual development.

Sir John Templeton Investing The Templeton Way

Called the “greatest stock picker of the century” by Money magazine, legendary fund manager Sir John Templeton is revered as one of the world’s premiere value investors, widely known for pioneering global investing and out-performing the stock market over a five-decade span. Investing the Templeton Way provides a never-before-seen glimpse into Sir John’s timeless principles and methods.

Beginning with a review of the methods behind Sir John’s proven investment selection process, Investing the Templeton Way provides historical examples of his most successful trades and explains how today’s investors can apply Sir John’s winning approaches to their own portfolios. Detailing his most well-known principle investing at the point of maximum pessimism- this book outlines the techniques Sir John has used throughout his career to identify such points and capitalize on them.

Sir John Templeton The Templeton Plan

Sir John Templeton (1912–2008), the Wall Street legend who has been described as “arguably the greatest global stock picker of the twentieth century,” clearly knew what it took to be successful. The most important thing, he observed, was to have strong convictions that guided your life—this was the common denominator he saw in all successful people and enterprises. Fortunately for us, he was eager to share his own blueprint for personal success and happiness with the rest of the world. In The Templeton Plan, he laid out the twenty-one guiding principles by which he governed both his professional and personal life.

These principles were grounded in virtues that he considered important enough to be considered the “laws of life”—they include honesty, perseverance, thrift, enthusiasm, humility, and altruism. From this moral foundation, Templeton formulated a step-by-step plan to help improve anyone’s personal and professional life.

Sir John Templeton The Humble Approach

For generations it has been assumed that the discoveries of science, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, tended to refute the beliefs of religious people and established religions, and challenged the very existence of God. Templeton makes a striking argument for just the opposite point of view. He goes to the writings of many of the world’s leading scientific thinkers – as diverse in background as Albert Einstein and Teilhard de Chardin – and discovers them in awe of the universe, perceiving the hand of Divine mystery at work. Templeton believes that the best way to know God is through a reverential, open, humble approach. He presents this humble approach as the one that many of the most distinguished scientists have come to in their quest for knowledge and meaning.

Sir John Marks Templeton was born on November 29, 1912, in Winchester, Tennessee. He graduated near the top of his class from Yale University (1934) and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford, where he earned a law degree (1936). Templeton embarked on his Wall Street career in 1938, when he began conceiving and launching some of the world’s most successful international investment funds. In 1954, he established the Templeton Growth Fund, which pioneered the use of globally diversified mutual funds. Money magazine would hail him as “arguably the greatest global stock picker of the century.”

Just as remarkable as Templeton’s financial career was his dedication to progress and philanthropy. Known as a contrarian investor, he was also a fierce optimist and relentless questioner in his personal life. Templeton thus promoted the discovery of “new spiritual information”: progress in understanding the deepest realities of human nature and the physical world, subjects that he believed should be investigated with the tools of modern science.

(Source: templetonworldcharity.org)

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GeoWire Monthly, Vol. 2, Issue No. 4, May 2022

May 10th, 2022|0 Comments

The stocks in our microcap Model Portfolios might get caught up in the capitulative mayhem in a macro sense, but we know that their growth outlooks, combined with their cheap valuations, will make for a recovery that we think will blow the pants off of their mega cap counterparts when this new cloud of dust settles.  To distill it down just a tad, it’s easier to double a $10 or $20 million revenue base than to double a greater than billion dollar valuation. Furthermore, the potential drop in stock prices of these large companies is steep. They’ve already grown to near their max potential but many still have P/Es in excess of 50x to 100x, or non-applicable P/Es because they’re losing money, which in a literal sense means there is no bottom to the stock’s price until you get to the value of ip, customer base, plants, property and equipment. It won’t take much for the latter to crumble, nor will it take much for the former to excel. Now, we believe the pendulum has swung to where earnings and P/E ratios will matter again. Hopefully, it will be the dominating factor in valuing companies as we transition from this bear market into the next bull trend. That’s how the environment was set up for the first 20 years of my career, where high-quality undervalued microcap companies were in high demand.

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How Bullish Trends in the IT Staffing Industry Could Help Rcm Technologies, Inc. (RCMT)

April 12th, 2022|0 Comments

A key take away from the RCMT conference call is that the demand for outsourced staffing growth trends is ripping higher, particularly in the IT and pharma markets. And quite honestly, this makes perfect sense. The U.S. is sitting at its lowest unemployment rate since late 1960’s, wages are increasing, the percent of the population over 55 is growing, the work from home and GIG trends (propensity to not seek full-time employment) are changing things up, immigration to the U.S. is at a low point and the participation rate of people actually looking for jobs is rapidly falling.